Let go of thoughts about the past or the future, and you gain the ability to be right here and now.

 

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The strength of your fears and expectations does not indicate their accuracy. The stronger or scarier the fear does not mean the likelier it is true. The only power your fear holds is the power you give it.

 

 

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Worry does not avoid problems. Worry is a problem.

 

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We perceive our worst fears in others’ thoughts. We judge ourselves by imagining what others are thinking about us. Just because you fear it doesn’t make it true.

 

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Our minds can always create plausible reasons to justify and confirm our inadequacies and fears. 

 

 

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We sometimes believe that the outcome we fear is somehow more ‘real’ or likely than the outcome we hope for. Somehow, it is easier to plan for the worst and maybe be pleasantly surprised than plan for the best and then have it taken away.

 

 

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A bad mood or attitude can exaggerate the negative. Sadness, anger, and other emotions are distorting. When you are down, bad situations in your mirror are smaller than they appear.

 

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When we feel bad, we believe that bad things are true without evidence, or that bad things are worse than they really are.

 

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Try to avoid thinking in absolutes. Most sentences that have ‘always’ or ‘never’ in them are exaggerations. Few things in life are perfect or totally bad.

 

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One Response to “On fear, anxiety, & negativity”

  1. Kirby Schacher
    September 1, 2013 at 5:57 am #

    Many childhood fears are normal developmental phenomenon. Fears tend to rise and dissipate at predictable ages in a child’s life after he/she grow up. Parents need to know information about how to treat anxiety naturally